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Tag: cscw

Mazmanian et al – 2015 – Circumscribed and porous time: Logics as a way of studying temporality

Summary: The authors extend classic CSCW literature to propose “porous time” as a new approach for examining sociotemporality that challenges the dominant temporal logic (see contested areas below). Four specific elements of porous time (spectral, mosaic, rhythmic, and obligated) are described as more realistic representations of lived experience and offer more multi-faceted ways to consider time in future theoretical and applied sociotemporal research.

Synthesis: Like the Lindley paper, Mazmanian, et al., contributes a much-needed re-engagement with and vocabulary to describe sociotemporality as a modern phenomenon. Building from Zerubavel and Reddy’s work and complementing Lindley’s meta review, this paper takes a more organizational theory approach by ethnographically examining sociotemporal tensions between work and family activities. The citations are a Who’s Who in organizational HCI via UC Irvine with references to earlier work by Voida, Palen, Mark, Bowker, and Grudin.

Lindley – 2015 – Making Time

Summary: Lindley’s position paper serves as an important theoretical bridge between classic sociotemporality literature and more recent interdisciplinary approaches to thinking about and designing for time. Acknowledging the contributions of Zerubavel, Orlikowski and Yates, and other works that have long informed HCI and CSCW research, the paper signposts new research that broadly explores temporality in organizational studies, HCI design, and coordination work.

Synthesis: This paper strikes me as a pretty urgent call to arms to integrate broader notions of sociotemporality into HCI research, including non-Western philosophies. That a fair number of different CSCW/CHI sub-disciplines began publishing about sociotemporal concerns in a brief period of time can’t be explained away as a happy accident. Without knowing the backstory, it does seems to hint that there was some rising concern within the qualitative HCI research community about the future direction of coordination work studies and about design implications for new SaaS/technical products that promote faster-paced lives at huge societal costs in terms of quality of life, stress, and misplaced (industrialized) values.

Reddy, Dourish + Pratt – 2006 – Temporality in Medical Work: Time also matters

Summary: An ethnomethodological study of information-seeking activity by SICU nurses. Reddy et al. proposed a trajectory/rhythm/horizon model to describe the sociotemporal dimensions of distributed work in the context of 24/7 shifts when workers are not co-located.

Synthesis: The study responds to a body of related CSCW literature on distributed work practices where distance dominates and spatiotemporal dimensions are entangled. Reddy et al., draw from a largely unexplored perspective that parses temporal perspectives from the spatial in order to better understand how people collaborate during information-seeking activities.